The Jobs I Want Are Out of Town—How Can I Search for Jobs from Here?

The Jobs I Want Are Out of Town—How Can I Search for Jobs from Here?

Looking for a job is hard enough, but looking for a job in one city while you’re living in another is even harder. Here’s what to do if you find yourself in this long-distance scenario:

1. Focus On One Area

Unless you have a specific job or industry in mind and are willing to move anywhere, concentrate on one geographical area at a time. Make sure to investigate salary ranges in this region so you know what’s appropriate.

2. Use Social Networking Sites

The internet really pays off for long-distance searches. Use Facebook, LinkedIn, and other sites to start unearthing contacts and opportunities in your target area.

3. Find A Temporary Place To Stay

Inexpensive options include friends, family, local YMCAs, and dorms in local schools.

4. Start Booking Interviews

Call companies you’re interested in. In order to interview, you’re going to have to travel. Say you’re moving to town, you’re planning to be there from X to Y date, and you’d like to set up informational interviews or interviews for concrete positions you’ve discovered. The more notice you give, the better. Once you’ve got enough interviews lined up, buy your ticket. Don’t book more than three per day, because you don’t want to be too exhausted or cut your interviews too close. Plan to stay at least two weeks. If you have no other options, ask if the company has special rates for local lodging; even some non-profits do.

5. Network Strategically On-Site

Visit places you’re likely to frequent if you move. Go to a gym and inquire about membership. Visit a religious service.  Set up appointments with realtors and banks. Look in the local paper for professional, social, and cultural events—but you’ve got to make an effort to talk to people. Explain that you’ll be moving if you get a job with XYZ company or in XYZ industry—you never know what leads you may be offered.  Find out if your college has a local alumni club or alumni career contacts.

6. Don’t Expect Reimbursement For Moving Or Travel Expenses

In this economy, don’t make any assumptions, although it never hurts to ask. Nonetheless, keep receipts as these expenses may be tax-deductible.

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