A New Generation of Money Mavens: 3 Personal Finance Pros to Watch

A New Generation of Money Mavens: 3 Personal Finance Pros to Watch

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Warren Buffett, Donald Trump, Suze Orman ... Look up any of these well-known financial experts, and you're sure to find loads of information on how to best manage your money, investments and savings.

But valuable personal finance advice isn't just limited to the old-schoolers. These three dynamos from fashion, psychology and academia represent a new crop of money gurus to keep on your radar.

The Fashion Darling: Sophia Amoruso, 30

Amoruso's online clothing shop Nasty Gal is just as much about empowerment as it is fashion—and she just wrote the book to prove it.

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In between fashion tips, Amoruso shells out money advice about taxes and choosing credit cards in "#GirlBoss." In the chapter titled, "Money Looks Better in the Bank Than on Your Feet," she harps on the advantages of treating your savings account like you would any other bill—and the consequences if you don't pay yourself first.

Her ultimate goal is to influence customers to make good money choices beyond what they wear. "At the end of the day, I don’t want it to be about clothes," she told Re/code. "It never was about clothes."

The Behavior Change Expert: Jordan Goldberg, 30

Goldberg, along with two Yale University professors, is the co-founder of StickK, a service that helps people achieve goals through "commitment contracts." These contracts create accountability by prompting you to commit a sum of money as collateral, to be donated to a charity, if you don't follow through on what you've pledged to do—whether that's cutting out your smoking habit or building up an emergency fund.

Need some extra motivation to stick with your goal? You can choose to commit a donation to a cause you don't support—so failing to reach a goal has greater repercussions.

Experiments suggest that we react the same way to money as we do to eating, sex and gambling—meaning our money decisions could be dictated as much by feelings as facts.

Goldberg's website has collected over $18 million in money on the line—suggesting that risk may be an effective alternative to reward in financial goal-setting. Case in point: Goldberg says that success rates are near 75% when money is on the line, while only 30% to 35% of people succeed without that incentive.

So next time you swear off splurge purchases or commit to saving $100 every month, consider following Goldberg's advice and putting some cash on the line. It just might help you achieve your money goals.

The Personal Finance Professor: Victor Ricciardi, 45

Ricciardi, a professor at Goucher College in Baltimore, MD, and a behavioral finance expert, has been gaining popularity (and expanding his network beyond his 68,000 Twitter followers) with the publication of his new book, "Investor Behavior: The Psychology of Financial Planning and Investing."

Among other topics, Ricciardi dives into the tenets of neuroeconomics and neurofinance—and talks about the process of researching the brain's emotional reactions to provocative stimuli.

Recent experiments suggest that we react the same way to money as we do to eating, sex and gambling—meaning our money decisions could be dictated as much by feelings as facts.

What's next for Ricciardi? He's now exploring just how much our subconscious might affect our spending. (Spoiler alert: A lot.)

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