The Market: March 2, 2012

Laura Shin
Posted

Here’s some economic news we can all cheer about. Unemployment claims dipped to a four-year-low this week, while store sales, because of the unseasonably warm winter which spurred spring shopping, were up compared to last year. However, the warm weather has also had a bad side effect: Numerous tornadoes in the Midwest killed a dozen people this week.

While the economy on our shores is getting back on its feet, Europe still seems to be ailing. A Greek default is looming, and this week a European panel of dealers and investors decided that private creditors exposed to a certain type of Greek debt won’t receive payouts.

Even if the American economy looks relatively stronger, harder times could be around the bend. Gas prices could reach $5 a gallon by summer, because of tensions with Iran and other international concerns. And it looks like Bank of America is considering raising its fees. Again.

Wall Street

This week, we look at how one surprising segment of the U.S. population is having to buckle down: well-heeled Wall Streeters, whose bonuses are down and who are feeling the pinch. We also take a closer look at one especially bright spot in the American corporate landscape: Apple, which this week became worth a mind-boggling $500 billion, making it more valuable than the entire economy of Singapore, or two Apollo space programs, or all the gold in the New York Federal Reserve.

Apple Stock Is Almost $550. But Is It Actually Underpriced?

Apple stock is at an all-time high. But could it still actually be a good deal? We show how to evaluate a stock, using Apple as an example.

Wall Street Bonuses Take a Hit. Is That Good or Bad?

Wall Street bonuses for 2011 fell, on average, 13% … but they still exceed six figures. Should we be concerned, or is this progress?

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