40 Financial Things You Should Know by 40

Alden Wicker
Posted

40 financial 40Many by-40 milestones have become debatable: Get married? Only if you really want to. Own a home? If it’s financially feasible. Know what you want to be when you grow up? Well, if 40 is the new 30, you’re certainly entitled to change your mind.

But there’s one thing that’s nonnegotiable: By age 40, you can’t get away with being financially clueless anymore. Especially since retirement might be a lot closer than you think! We’ve put together 40 money things, big and small, you should know before you turn the big 4-0. Why? So you can help achieve your financial goals with plenty of time left over to enjoy them!

1. The three basics of a solid financial foundation. Credit card debt paid off. Emergency fund stocked up. Retirement account(s) in existence and growing. Everything else (travel, homeownership, investments) should come after. 

2. How to create a budget. Because without one, you may not reach any of your goals, like buying a home, paying off your credit card debt or traveling the world. Learn how to build your budget with our step-by-step guide.

3. How much you should be saving. The answer: 20%. Not sure how we arrived at this number? Look no further than the 50/20/30 rule, which divvies up your monthly budget as follows: 50% is reserved for essentials (think mortgage, rent and groceries), 30% is allocated for your lifestyle choices and at least 20% goes to “financial priorities,” which includes your debt payments, your retirement contributions and your savings. Here’s more detail on the why and how of saving a fifth of your paycheck.

4. Your net worth. Yes, you have one. This is the sum total of your assets (bank account balances, savings, investments, etc.) minus your debts (loans, mortgage, credit card debt, etc.). Your net worth is the easiest way to get a big-picture perspective on your finances. Want a quick way to figure it out? Link your accounts in the free LearnVest Money Center, and we’ll do the calculating for you.

5. How much you make and how much you spend each month. It sounds like a no-brainer, right? “But most people, regardless of their age, don’t know how much money they have coming in and going out,” says Natalie Taylor, a CFP® with LearnVest Planning Services. For a full breakdown, visit the Money Center to see your incoming versus outgoing finances.

RELATED: 3 Households, 3 Budgets: How We Divvy Up Our Paychecks

6. How to get out of debt. Now is the time to be saving for your future, not paying off your past. Hopefully your debt repayment efforts are already in full swing, but, if you’re not there yet, now’s the time to make a plan. Here, a quick checklist to help you. Want the big kahuna? Get Out of Debt Bootcamp is our three-day, in-depth plan to help you finally live a debt-free life.

7. Your credit score. Still not familiar with this number? Afraid to look? Here’s why, by 40, you should know it cold. Your credit score determines not only what kind of credit cards you’ll get approved for but also how expensive your mortgage and car loan would be. Learn how to monitor and improve your credit score here. Speaking of …

8. How to pull a free credit report. Voilà.

RELATED: The Mistake That Plunged My Credit Score 200 Points

9. It can take a long time to save up a down payment. When it comes to buying a house, “People always say, ‘Get in as soon as you can,’ and ‘It’s O.K. to be house poor.’ But before buying a house, you should be financially stable. If that’s not until your 30s or 40s, that’s O.K. So many people have rushed in, and then they can’t handle the payments,” says Taylor. Find out how much house you can afford.

RELATED: Adventures in Real Estate: I Bought a House at 21

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  • http://macreview.com/ Mac Review

    It’s great to stumble to this post. I’m 30 years old and almost debt free, and currently starting to build my emergency fund. Seems like I’m still on track after all – Yay! =)

    • mara

      same here!! let’s do this!!

  • Bonne

    Very enriching. There are so much to learn and so much to share about investing and planning how to grow your money. Thanks for this article.

  • Eric Raikanya

    Great article..good insights

  • queensgirl

    Great tips, in general, but there’s a typo in #39: it’s “effect change,” not “affect change.”