Workweek 2.0: Are You Clocking 72 Hours on the Job?

Anna Williams
Posted

72 hour work weekThe old 9-5 is increasingly a thing of the past.

According to a new Center for Creative Leadership survey of executives, managers and professionals (EMPs), the majority of respondents who use smartphones are now interacting with their jobs for more than 13 hours per weekday, plus up to five hours on weekends … which tallies up to a grand total of 72 hours per week.

Overall, the EMPs expressed that they didn’t mind being constantly connected. In fact, 60% of respondents said they actually appreciate the flexibility that smartphones can provide, as long as being super-reachable doesn’t interfere too much with their personal lives or their productivity and creativity at work.

However, many respondents expressed frustration with the poor business practices of the now constantly-connected workplace. It seems that our smartphones might be enabling both our hyper-connectivity—and our inefficiency.

In a recent Harvard Business Review blog, lead study author Jennifer J. Deal explains how one manager she interviewed was asked by an executive to join in on a strategy call—at 9 p.m. on Friday night, while he was on a date. It wasn’t an emergency situation by any means, but the executive had access to the manager via his smartphone, so when he wanted to flip-flop on a decision that he had made earlier in the week, he figured that he’d just set up another phone meeting.

These inefficiencies, as the study report calls situations like this, are reinforced by that “electric leash that the company can yank at will.”

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Some more shocking math: Clocking in so many job-related hours also means that, if you add in about seven and a half hours of sleep, the EMPs are left with only about three hours each workday for non-work activities—you know, like showering, exercising, and spending time with family.