Which Are the Richest and Poorest States?

When it comes to wealth, it's all about location, location location.

The latest Census data for 2011 was released Thursday, revealing some telling numbers about our economy--and where your state ranks on the income scale.

Maryland is killing it. (Proud Marylander right here!) In the land of crabs and football, which has been the richest state since before the recession, median income is $70,000. Unemployment is at a low 10.1%, the second lowest in the nation.

In the land of cotton and catfish down south (Mississippi), the livin' aint easy. The median income of $36,919 has once again placed the state down at the bottom (and below the income proven to lead to happiness, of $50,000) . It also has the highest poverty rate, at 22.6% of residents, and unemployment increased from 2010 to 2011 by .2%. Only one other state saw its unemployment numbers go up during the same time.

Anyone up for some skiing and fall foliage watching? Vermont earns a special mention, as it was the only state that saw an increase in income between 2010 and 2011. Eighteen states saw a decrease, while the rest had incomes that stayed flat during that time.

Not Everyone Gets the Pie

While income inequality was especially high in poor states (except for West Virginia), three overall rich states suffer from have-and-have-not syndrome: California, Connecticut and Massachusetts rank near the top of income inequality. Experts say high income inequality is often associated with a state having high-income urban centers and low-income rural areas that rely on agriculture.

Want to find out all the richest and poorest states? Click through the slideshow to find out.

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