6 Careers That Bring in the Big Bucks

Posted

wealthy lady stepping out of carHere’s another fun post from our friends at Savvy Sugar. Check it out:

Sure, we’d all love to find our dream job, but sometimes living off happiness fumes just isn’t enough. There are needs to be met, and money definitely helps us achieve some of life’s necessities, or at the very least, make things more comfortable and convenient. Is making lots of moola your biggest goal? Read on to find out which careers to shoot for.

Investment Banker

As an investment banker, you do things like calculate how much a company is worth and help companies raise money through an IPO or transactions to raise debt.

Although there’s a lot of money to be made, investment banking is known to be a tough and intense career path with 100-hour workweeks and way too many all-nighters. In fact, a University of Southern California researcher found that her investment banker participants developed ailments like insomnia, drug addictions and heart palpitations within a few years on the job.

Average salary according to Indeed.com: $107,000. Keep in mind that the salary will change with seniority, and the bonus is oftentimes equivalent to or more than the actual base salary.

Surgeon

Being a surgeon can be a rewarding and profitable career path. However, keep in mind that schooling will cost you about 11 to 16 years of your life starting with four years of undergrad, four years at medical school, three to five years of residency training at a hospital, and one to three years for specialty training.

Being a doctor may mean that you’re always on call, and not to mention, you have to handle the stress of possibly being responsible for someone’s life on a day-to-day basis.

Average salary according to Bureau of Labor Statistics: $225,390.

Tech Start-Up Founders

Studied computer science and can program like a whiz? Maybe you have the next big idea that’s going to turn the tech world on its head. Successful start-up founders like Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Google’s Larry Page have the potential to make billions. On the downside, there are many, many more start-ups that fail versus ones that succeed.

Lawyer

As a lawyer you can expect to make an average salary of about $129,440 a year, according to BLS. Although it’s a high-paying gig, it’s also a very stressful and competitive one. In fact, there is such an influx of law-school students that there’s not enough attorney jobs available, leaving many law graduates with huge debts and dim job prospects.

Psychiatrist

Getting paid to hear people’s problems doesn’t sound so bad, does it? A psychiatrist can stand to make an average of $167,610, according to BLS figures. Don’t forget that psychiatrists need a medical degree, so you’ll be going through the same amount of training that a doctor goes through, which means years and years of hitting the books and training in hospitals. The demand for psychiatrists is expected to grow at a rate faster than average in the next few years, says the BLS.

Remember that being a psychiatrist can be a very high-stress job. In fact, a lot of psychiatrists see their own psychiatrists to keep themselves in check.

Dentist

Dentistry is a steady career path and definitely a money-making one as well. Dentists make about an average of $158,770 every year, says the BLS. This career has been ranked as 12 on the list of the best jobs in America by CNN. You’ll have regular hours as a dentist, unlike many doctors who work around the clock and have more emergencies to deal with.

More From Savvy Sugar

Hate your job and want to leave? Maybe you just need to appreciate it. Here are ten ways to fall back in love with your job.
Check out these 15 tips for a better work-life balance.
Looking for a new job? Master these ten typical interview questions.

  • Guest

    Keep in mind that these are *average* figures, so many of these salaries are skewed up by a number of things.  For example, as a lawyer, I can tell you that number is pretty inflated and probably skewed higher based on the salaries of lawyers working at big law firms (and many lawyers do not end up at big law firms).  I went to a top-tier law school and most of my friends were in the top 20% of our class.  A few of them couldn’t find jobs after law school, many went into government and non-profit work, and only two of my friends ended up at a big law firm making a six-digit salary.  Keep in mind that all of us are heavily in debt (I have almost $100,000 in loans).  Just wanted to throw that out there before everyone thinks the above figures are accurate.  By the way, even though it might sound like it, I don’t regret going to law school – I did my research before going, I knew what career path I wanted, and I was prepared for the amount of debt I would have (but I also knew that if I worked in public service for 10 years, which was my goal anyway, my government loans would be forgiven).  The people who are unsatisfied are the people who don’t do their research.