Learn More in Kindergarten to Make More Money Down the Road

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We are big fans of starting early to see major results (think: investing your money early for bigger rewards down the road). The same holds true for education.

The Younger Minds Are the Most Impressionable

Children really do take in and absorb what they’re exposed to at a young age, and they continue to be affected by this throughout their lives. We don’t want our kids growing up with money baggage, so we start small by sharing our money values, teaching them to express gratitude and knowing how to work for what they want when they’re small. Little actions can leave a big imprint on those tiny minds. We also think that a great, early education can go a long way.

To read up on how to best to teach your little ones about money, check out today’s post on the future net worth of your children.

The Anti-Education Case

In the past there has been a lot of debate regarding the impact that a “great” kindergarten teacher can have on his/her students. Sure, there are plenty of immediate positive effects, but these usually fall victim to the “fade-out effect” and show little influence by the time subjects are in high school. Especially with recent reports telling us that even a great education can’t shield you from the wrath of unemployment, there’s a lot going against investing more in education.

Lasting (Real) Results

In a New York Times piece, they follow a Harvard economist and his team of researchers who agree with us: an early impact can have big results. How big are we talking? According to their report, students who learned more in kindergarten were more likely to go to college, less likely to become single parents, were more likely to be saving for retirement (Woo!), and were, get this… earning more.

Staying ‘Safe’ From Unemployment

Sure, no one is ‘safe’ from unemployment. But data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show us that education certainly does pay off. Check out their chart for proof that education pays in higher earnings and lower unemployment rates.

  • Anonymous

    Here’s the question I’d love to hear from readers on, then: Does this change your mind on a debate that’s been going on about whether college/grad school is actually worth the huge cost? (For what I’m talking about, you can look here: http://www.learnvest.com/money-tuneup/career/the-rising-cost-of-graduate-school-is-it-worth-it/)